Mapping the PLT Competency Standards

 Overview

This page provides maps of the Australian Competency Standards for Entry Level Lawyers, which is the framework used for Practical Legal Training in most jurisdictions.

This first map gives you an overview. The competencies are divided under 3 main headings, “Skills”, “Practice Areas”, and “Values.

Competencies

This map shows each of the competencies under the main headings.

Map Overview of PLT Competency Standards
Map of Australian PLT Competency Standards

Competency Elements

Each of the competencies are broken down into “Elements”, and each element have set performance criteria.  For ease of comprehension, I have set out only the elements and have excluded the performance criteria.

Values

Values
Values

 

Ethics and Professional Responsibility Elements
Elements of Ethics and Professional Responsibility

 Skills

Skills
Skills Competencies
Lawyers' Skills
Lawyers' Skills Elements

 

Problem Solving Competency
Problem Solving Elements

 

Work Management and Business Skills Elements
Work Management and Business Skills Elements

 

Trust and Office Accounting Elements
Trust and Office Accounting Elements

 Practice Areas

Practice Areas Competencies
Practice Areas Competencies
Civil Litigation Practice Area Elements
Civil Litigation Practice Area Elements

 

Commercial and Corporate Practice Elements
Commercial and Corporate Practice Elements

 

Property Law Practice Elements
Property Law Practice Elements

 

Group 1 Elective Competencies
Group 1 Elective Competencies
Administrative Law Practice Elements
Administrative Law Practice Elements
Criminal Law Practice Elements
Criminal Law Practice Elements

 

Family Law Practice Elements
Family Law Practice Elements
Group 2 Elective Competencies
Group 2 Elective Competencies
Consumer Law Practice Elements
Consumer Law Practice Elements
Employment and Industrial Relations Practice Elements
Employment and Industrial Relations Practice Elements
Wills and Estates Law Practice Elements
Wills and Estates Law Practice Elements
Planning and Environment Law Practice Elements
Planning and Environment Law Practice Elements

 Watch this Space…

The Competency Standards are to be reviewed and changes are possible in the next year or so.

I hope to create a more dynamic and interactive concept map of the competencies and their elements in the future.

What do you think?

How do you feel about the current competencies? Are they sufficient or is there too much? Feel free to comment below.

 
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5 thoughts on “Mapping the PLT Competency Standards”

  1. I didn’t know we had Human Rights law in Australia, there was talk about a framework, the Constitution has only very few rights, the International HR Conventions are not incorporated into law, though some concepts may be. Practising HR must be very confusing.

  2. Hello Jim, you can access the current document for the competency standards for entry level lawyers in Australia at: http://www.aplec.asn.au/aplec/dsp_resources.cfm. The competency standards are being reviewed and may change in the future. You would also need to contact the admitting authority in the State or Territory in which you expect to apply for admission; each admitting authority seems to apply its own criteria to exemptions sought by lawyers from overseas jurisdictions. Good luck!

  3. I have been a practing attorney in the United States for 13 yeears and am in the process of applying for Academic and Practical Training Exemptions. I am using the Competency Elements as a guideline and am wondering if you have the performance criteria for the elements available for review somewhere. I am particularly interested in the Practice areas of Commercial & Corporate Practice, Property Law Practice, Consumer Law Practice, Employment & Industrial Law Practice and Wills & Estates Law Practice. Any information will be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you,
    Jim

  4. Christopher, thank you for your comment. Anecdotally, I understand that some decision-makers are keen to reinforce the statutory interpretation skills in the PLT competencies. Recent events such as the Malaysian Transfer case do highlight how good statutory interpretation skills are essential.
    I recently ran an Administrative Law Practice workshop, during which I asked, “Who here is interested in pursuing Human Rights as an area of practice?”. Several hands went up. Then I asked, “Who here likes to read legal documents”, to which there was a muted response. I observed to the group that to practice in administrative law and human rights law, one needs to get into the habit of reading, and reading critically. The group did look a bit discouraged!
    As to how many judges(?) display a fundamental understanding of the nature of the task of statutory interpretation, I would not presume to say, but like so many things in the skills area, everyone has a view on what ought to be done!

  5. I have spent the bulk of my career researching and writing about legal skills. Putting it shortly I believe that there is fundamental neglect of the purely legal skills that spills over into practice. To give a quick illustration, and I say this with respect, consider all the articles by judges on statutory interpretation. Then ask: How many of them display a fundamental understanding of the nature of the task?

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