Update – DSM-5 – Mental Health Disclosures for Lawyers

As reported in my earlier blog post…

It is my understanding that most Australian medical practitioners would refer to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) to categorise and assist in the identification of mental disorders.

By way of update – A revised edition of the manual (DSM-5) is due to be published in 2013.  Apparently each revision of the DSM attracts some controversy. The lead up to the release of DSM-5 is no exception. Some commentators in the mental health field are concerned about the broadening of criteria for identification of certain mental health disorders; see this article in The Age, for example.  It will be interesting to see what impact, if any, this issue has for the development of mental health policy in within the jurisdiction of disclosures for admission to the profession and grant/renewal of practising certificates.

You can read my original blog post here.

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Practical Legal Training Educators Australia

I have set up a new group on LinkedIn: Practical Legal Training Australia.

I hope that this will be a useful place for discussions about research and practice for educators involved in Practical Legal Training.

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How to “do” Feedback in PLT – an evidence-based approach

Thinking about your teaching in 2012?  Consider reflecting on your approach to providing feedback to your students from an evidence-based perspective.

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APLEC 2011

The Australasian Professional Legal Education Council (APLEC) Conference for 2011 (APLEC 2011) was hosted by the University of Technology Sydney Faculty of Law during 10-12 November 2011 at their campus in Quay Street, Haymarket.

Keynote speakers include: Professor Paul Maharg, Professor Sally Kift, Paul F. Wood, Executive Director, Legal Education Society of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, and Elizabeth Loftus.

I have posted my impressions from the conference.

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Mapping the PLT Competency Standards

I have created some maps of the current Australian Competency Standards for Entry Level Lawyers adopted for Practical Legal Training Programs.

See more!

Competency Standards Overview Map

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Support for Law Graduates Undertaking Practical Legal Training?

…employers and supervisors do have ethical, legal and professional obligations to ensure the graduate actually does receive and undertake their practical legal training.

I submit that it is in everybody’s interest to provide a supportive environment for PLT graduates to undertake their practical legal training.  Real support would include actual time being allocated (and taken) to properly undertake the PLT coursework, and legal practitioners supporting PLT as a worthwhile undertaking that is important and relevant to building an entry-level lawyer’s competency to undertake legal practice.

 

Read More…

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PLT: Not a Sausage Factory (or ought not to be)

Read the article PLT: Not a Sausage Factory (or ought not to be)

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