‘Transactional Learning Environment’ and ‘Developing Professional Character’, in Affect and Legal Education

Karen Barton and Fiona Westwood’s chapter, ‘Developing Professional Character – Trust, Values and Learning’ in Paul Maharg and Caroline Maughan (eds), Affect and Legal Education – Emotion in Learning and Teaching the Law, Emerging Legal Learning (Ashgate, 2011) 235, is a very good read.

This is a copy of my post to the LinkedIn discussion group, Practical Legal Training Educators Australia.

The chapter has helpful introductory parts about the ‘repositioning of professionalism and the role of legal education’ (p 237), and ‘mastering the craft of lawyering’ using the ‘head, hand and heart’ metaphor (p 238). The authors identify 4 categories of student ‘firms’ that emerge in the transactional legal education environment, in a learning/trust matrix, where each firm has a mix ‘high’ or ‘low’ levels of trust and learning (p 242). The objective, of course, is to develop high trust/high learning student firms (p 244). The authors describe some of the strategies taken as part of an early intervention approach to identify student firms that seem to be tending toward low trust and/or low learning types. These include training of practice management tutors, and techniques to encourage reflective practices amongst the students including reflection on own individual and group work styles and common values (pp 244-8).

Selfishly perhaps, I wanted to know a bit more detail about actual student-student interactions and tutor-student interactions given the importance of ‘forming a team’ (p 246) and that ‘shared values were an integral part’ of the activity (p 247). At p 247, the authors note that ‘…our students did not choose their fellow team members … it was important that they learned to feel secure with each other … this feeling of security was facilitated by their initial discussions.’ It would be good to see more information in the article about those initial discussions, the medium through which they were conducted, and the strategies and methods used to facilitate them, given the importance of those discussions to setting up the activity, as reflected in the student quotes, particularly one on p 251, ‘My concern for the success of the firm began from its inception…’.

Share

Research Tool Tip

I use EndNote for recording references and bibliographic details, and type my research notes into the Endnote research note field for that reference (I also add a pdf of journal articles etc in the figures field). This way I can save a research note with a page or pinpoint reference, and the research note is always attached to that reference. An added bonus is that the entire database can be backed up regularly to avoid future heartache.

But there’s more, I am using Scrivener to write ‘scraps’ and chapters; these can be sorted a bit like index cards and then eventually exported to Word as a final document.
In Scrivener, there is a research folder to which you can drag documents for ease of reference when working on your scraps/chapters.

Experimenting with Endnote this morning, I find I can easily export a single reference with its bibliographic details and all of the content of the research notes field to a text or RTF document. This document can then be dragged to the research folder in Scrivener, so you can easily switch between the research note and the scrap on which you are working.

The method: In Endnote, finish working on the reference and close the reference. Select the reference in the list of references in the main window. Go to File > Export > Type in a unique name for the export file > Select the location to save the file (I use Desktop) > Save as Text Only or RTF > in Output Style, select ‘Show All Fields’ > make sure the ‘Export Selected References’ checkbox is checked > Click ‘Save’. A text document or RTF document will save to your desktop.

I am also using Evernote to save internet pages and info – those items can be sorted and filed in Evernote, and then exported from Evernote as a document to be dragged into the research folder in Scrivener.

Of course, annotated PDF documents can also be dragged into the Scrivener research folder, together with other media such as audio and movie files.

Share

Using Graphic Organisers in Practical Legal Training

Did you know that substantial research and scholarship shows that Graphic Organisers (such as mind maps, flow charts, and other visual representations) can produce improvements in learning outcomes with average effect sizes of 1.2 to 1.3? See more.

Share

Practical Legal Training Educators Australia

I have set up a new group on LinkedIn: Practical Legal Training Australia.

I hope that this will be a useful place for discussions about research and practice for educators involved in Practical Legal Training.

Share

Mind Maps!

I have a thing for mind maps (or concept maps). Due to a bout of influenza that laid me low for 3 weeks years ago during law school I had to sit a closed book contract exam 5 months after I studied the subject. Mind maps got me through. I am progressively adding some recent mind maps (mostly focused on education) to a new page.

Mind Map - SOLO Taxonomy
SOLO Taxonomy
Share

APLEC, Paul Maharg

I had a enjoyed a short but encouraging exchange with Paul Maharg re online legal education, I recommend a visit to his blog – APLEC, Friday am, presentations, 1 & 2 — Paul Maharg.

Share

PLT: Not a Sausage Factory (or ought not to be)

Read the article PLT: Not a Sausage Factory (or ought not to be)

Share